Forestry

Students majoring in forestry are working to ensure the sustainability one of society's most vital natural resources. This major addresses both the scientific and human elements of forest ecosystem management, and you'll learn about the life cycle and management of hundreds of tree species. You'll graduate with a sense of stewardship and land-use ethics, and be prepared to take an active role in finding new and better ways to conserve, use, and sustain the world's vital forest resources. Students majoring in forestry take courses in the following core areas: forest science, geospatial analysis, environmental economics, and natural resources policy.

Students will also take courses based on their specific option in one of the following areas:

  • Forest operations and business — Fire ecology and management, forest biometrics, soil management, forest harvesting, timber procurement, forest management, accounting, business writing, and business law and ethics.
  • Forest resources management — Fire ecology and management, forest biometrics, forestry field skills, outdoor recreation management, forest harvesting, forest boundaries, soil management, forest pest management, accounting, chemistry, and physical science.
  • Urban forestry — Urban forest management, forest and tree pests, soil, horticulture, landscape architecture, urban affairs, and physical science.

Career options

  • Consulting forester
  • Extension agent
  • Forest biologist
  • Forest entomologist
  • Forest manager
  • Forest technician
  • Government forester
  • Landowner assistance forester
  • Natural resources planning and policy advisor
  • Procurement forester
  • Urban forester/plant health care technician
  • Wildland firefighter